Your assignment is a Unit Plan, which means that you must provide at least 5 lessons in plans.? As you have likely noticed, we are using some of th

  • Your assignment is a Unit Plan, which means that you must provide at least 5 lessons in plans. 
  • As you have likely noticed, we are using some of the same scenarios that we used for our gradual release model lesson plan. IF you plan to use the same scenario, you CAN use the lesson that you already created as one of your lessons. 
  • Be sure to follow the rubric provided in Portfolio as that is exactly how you will be graded.

  • 3066TaskstreamRubric.docx

  • 3066TaskstreamCasescenarios.docx

  • gr066PortfolioUnitExample.docx

3066 Final Lesson Plan Rubric

Final Lesson Plan Content

Points

(a)  Lesson Plan Topic: Subject Area, Integrated Subject Area, Grade and Specific Topic are all identified.

2

(b) Case Scenario: Written as assigned by the professor.

2

(c) Objectives: Clearly define the “terminal skill” ; each objective is measurable and observable. 

8

(d) Standards:  Includes complete standard:

              FSA LAFS OR MAFS; FEAP AND ESOL

3

(e) Materials: All are listed as identified within the lesson plan, and aligned to the

5

(f) Accommodations: The list of accommodations specifically delineates the students with disabilities in the class as identified in the scenario.

8

(g) Set: Clearly introduces the lesson content in an engaging manner.

10

(h) Body (Procedures): The I do, We do, You do it Together and You to Alone are clear and follow the list below:

              Modeled Instruction / Demonstrate: I do it –you watch

              Shared Instruction / Guide: We do it -together

              Guided Practice / Collaborative Learning: You do it together –I watch /

              guide – an emphasis on differentiation is reflected                              

              Independent Practice / Independent Learning: You do it alone

20

(i) Closure: Summarizes the lesson

5

(j)  Assessment: Both formative and summative assessments are identified; the assessments used clearly assess each of the lesson objectives.

12

(k) Reflection: Discuss if designing the lesson to reflect the diversity of students in the class had an impact on your future instructional practices.

5

(l) Differentiation Analysis: Does the lesson plan provide for a substantial differentiation of instruction as specified in the Differentiated Instruction matrix.

10

TOTAL

90

 

,

LESSON PLAN CLASS SCENARIOS

Scenario 1

Your class is comprised of 25 students you are the exceptional student education support facilitator in the class. This means that you go into the class several times a day for specific content areas (e.g., Science). There are 21 typically developing students in the class and 4 students with a-typical development. Although most typically developing students are at grade level, some are not and they often need assistance with vocabulary. Also the ESE students consist of a child with specific learning disabilities (SLD) who is functioning two years below and has difficulty with phonics. A student with Autism who is on grade level phonetically but has difficulty with comprehension and wanting to go to the computer. There are also two students with Other Health Impairment (OHI) due to ADHD; they are on grade level for comprehension but have difficulty initiating or completing tasks.You have been asked by the classroom teacher to create a lesson plan for next week.

Scenario 2 There are 22 students in your designated “Inclusion” class. The designation of inclusion means that although there are two teachers (general education and ESE teacher) in class close to 50% of the students have a disability. The disabilities include 4 students with SLD; two having difficulty with phonics and two with comprehension. There are 3 students with ADHD; two having significant memory difficulties and one having difficulty with organizational skills. One two has intellectual disabilities and is on a modified curriculum. He is on an access point curriculum. Your co teacher asks that you develop lesson plan for coming week. Scenario 3 Although you are the resource ESE teacher at your school , in the afternoon you are the coteacher for Science class. There are 28 students in that class. Three are students with SLD; one having difficulty with phonics and the other two with abstract comprehension (e.g., making inferences). There are two OHI students; one with Epilepsy who has seizure activity weekly and this has impacted his comprehension. The other student is ADHD and Gifted. He has difficulty completing tasks and projects. It is your responsibility to develop the lesson plan for the coming week.

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Portfolio Assignment Example

UNIT PLAN (5 LESSONS)

Scenario 1 (be sure to include which scenario you chose from the list provided )

Your class is comprised of 25 students and you are the exceptional student education support facilitator in the class. This means that you go into the class several times a day for specific content areas. There are 21 typically developing students in the class and 4 students with a-typical development. Although most typically developing students are at grade level, some are not and they often need assistance with vocabulary. Also, the ESE students consist of a child with specific learning disabilities (SLD) who is functioning two years below and has difficulty with phonics. A student with Autism who is on grade level phonetically but has difficulty with comprehension and wanting to go to the computer. There are also two students with Other Health Impairment (OHI) due to ADHD; they are on grade level for comprehension but have difficulty initiating or completing tasks. You have been asked by the classroom teacher to create a unit plan with 5 lessons.

LESSON PLAN #1

Subject Area: English Language Arts Integrated Subject: History

Grade: 7 Specific Topic: Comprehension

Objective/s: Students will determine the theme/central idea of a text and be able to show their thought processes through graphic organizers. By the end, students will learn to use at least one type of graphic organizer to study.

Standards: (Include complete standard)

LAFS.7.RL.1.2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text; provide an objective summary of the text.

Materials:

Whiteboard

Projector

Laptop/computer (teacher’s)

Copy of “The Little Red Riding Hood”

Graphic organizers printed on paper (1 per student available)

Assistive technology (4 speech-to-text tablets and online graphic organizers)

Computer lab

Accommodations:

Relevant topics to relate with students

Verbal guidance explaining each task to be done

Numerous ways to complete assignment (can be digital, completed with AT, written)

Two different graphic organizers to choose from

Computer access

(Scenario accommodations):

Frequent breaks to complete tasks

Distracting items or noises in classroom eliminated/limited

Allowed extra time to complete graphic organizers

Positive reinforcement and positive feedback

Assistive technology (speech-to-text and text-to-speech)

Set: Teacher will ask students what their favorite childhood story is. As students bring up their memories, the teacher will ask them what the main plot was of those stories to get them in the right frame of mind for the lesson. The teacher will share the historical background of the stories and their authors when applicable. Then, the teacher will introduce The Little Red Riding Hood.

Modeled Instruction / Demonstrate: When the first student shares their childhood story, the teacher will make two different graphic organizers (sequence chart and main idea web) and follow along with that student. This is a demonstration of how to use the graphic organizers.

Shared Instruction / Guide: The teacher will make several web charts and sequence charts on the board and fill out the spaces as students describe their favorite childhood stories. Together the teacher and students will decide what material is written on which side of these graphic organizers. Students may also write on the board if they request.

Guided Practice / Collaborative Learning: Students will read The Little Red Riding Hood in turns alongside the teacher. The teacher will take breaks for students to write in their own graphic organizer. Together, students and teachers will research the historical background of the author and time period. Students will use ½ graphic organizers shown earlier in the lesson.

Independent Practice / Independent Learning: Students use their own graphic organizer and read another European folktale from that time of their choice. Alongside that, students will break out into groups and research the historical background of the authors and the time when the story of their choice was written. They can share their research with one another.

Closure: Students will effectively retell the main plot of their story and the historical background of it in a minimum of 3 paragraphs, using their graphic organizers as outlines.

Assessment:

#1 Students will complete ½ graphic organizers as they read the story.

#2 Students will write an essay of ⅗ paragraphs detailing the main plot and historical background of their story.

Reflection: (To be completed at the end of lesson; Be sure to be reflective about your teaching behaviors and student outcomes (academic and behavioral).

If students do not respond as expected in this assessment, the teacher will work with students using a sequence chart to write about the historical backgrounds of some of their stories. If specific students need more assistance on their own stories, the teacher will break out into a group with those students.

LESSON PLAN #2

Subject Area: English Language Arts Integrated Subject: Reading

Grade: 7 Specific Topic: Comprehension

Objective/s: Students will be able to point out key aspects of drama/poetry structure and how it creates the writing’s meaning.

Standards: (Include complete standard)

LAFS.7.RL.2.5 Analyze how a drama’s or poem’s form or structure (e.g., soliloquy, sonnet) contributes to its meaning.

Materials:

Whiteboard

Projector

Laptop/computer (teacher’s)

Copies of the poem “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost

Highlighters, pens, pencils (to annotate papers)

Multiple choice quizzes printed

Assistive technology (4 speech-to-text tablets)

Tablets/phones allowed to access online quiz documents

Accommodations:

Relevant topics to relate with students so that poem’s language is not too confusing

Guided analysis of poem with students

Verbal guidance explaining each task to be done

Numerous ways to complete assignment (can use AT, write, or type)

Students put in groups to use each other’s strengths

(Scenario accommodations):

Frequent breaks to complete tasks

Preferential setting when writing about poem

Mixed-ability groups

Limited to no noise distractions

Multiple choice quizzes can be completed orally or on tablets/phones

Allowed extra time to complete quizzes and tasks

Positive reinforcement and positive feedback

Assistive technology (speech-to-text and text-to-speech)

Set: The teacher will ask students about their experiences with having to make big decisions. For example: “Did you have another school your parents were thinking of sending you to? Have you ever had to decide between two options? How did that change your life? How do you think things would have turned out had you chosen the other option?”

Modeled Instruction / Demonstrate: The teacher will read Ella Wheeler Wilcox’s “It Might Have Been” to the class. The teacher will explain how this poem relates to the conversation they had at the start of the lesson.

Shared Instruction / Guide: Teacher will demonstrate how to make a main idea web chart for the poem. The teacher will elude to the first lesson to refresh students on how to use this graphic organizer for poetry, and how it is a versatile tool. The teacher will then speak about how poetry has a particular rhythm and flow compared to narrative stories and dissect one stanza using the annotation tools listed above. There are 4 stanzas in total in this particular poem.

Guided Practice / Collaborative Learning: Students will dissect the remaining 3 stanzas of the poem in 3 mixed-ability groups. This will be a short activity and each group will share one brainstorming paper to share with the teacher or present to the class. Together each group will write about the particular language and spacing/breathing used in the poem and how it contributes to its atmosphere and significance.

Independent Practice / Independent Learning: On their own, students will read the poem “The Road Not Taken” by Robert Frost and annotate the stanzas given the knowledge they have. The teacher will walk around and assist students who need it, and give frequent breaks as well as positive reinforcement to those who are participating. Students will then discuss amongst each other their findings. Students will annotate 2/4 stanzas. They will highlight 4/6 quotes from the poem.

Closure: The teacher will pass out multiple choice question papers to each student. There will be 10 multiple choice questions and one written portion. Students will not be graded but will serve as a non-formative assessment to gauge where students are at. Students will complete 7/10 questions. Finally, students will write ⅗ paragraphs on the structure of the poem and explain its main idea and how it came to be using the poem’s structure.

Assessment:

#1 Students will complete multiple choice questions. Regardless of whether they get the right answers or not, students must complete 7/10 questions. This counts for 4/10 of the points available for this lesson.

#2 Students will write an essay on the poem and share their findings on the dissection of the stanzas in a minimum of 3 paragraphs out of 5. They will identify and cite ⅗ quotes from the poem. This counts for 6/10 of the points available for this lesson.

Reflection: (To be completed at the end of lesson; Be sure to be reflective about your teaching behaviors and student outcomes (academic and behavioral).

If students do not respond as expected in this assessment, there will be guided instruction on this poem and how the structure of it impacts its meaning. There will also be more breaks added so that students can talk more amongst themselves in mixed-ability groups alongside the teacher.

LESSON PLAN #3

Subject Area: English Language Arts Integrated Subject: Reading

Grade: 7 Specific Topic: Comprehension

Objective/s: Students will be able to identify ⅖ elements of a story and identify 2/4 ways the setting of that story shapes the plot and its characters.

Standards: (Include complete standard)

LAFS.7.RL.1.3 Analyze how particular elements of a story or drama interact (e.g., how setting shapes the characters or plot).

Materials:

Whiteboard

Projector

Laptop/computer (teacher’s)

Copies of The Necklace by Guy de Maupassant

Annotating tools (highlighter, pencil, pen)

Graphic organizers (sequence charts and main idea webs)

Assistive technology (4 speech-to-text tablets)

Accommodations:

Guided questions provided to students

Verbal guidance explaining each task to be done

Students put in groups to use each other’s strengths

Computer lab available to students when they break out into groups

(Scenario accommodations):

Frequent breaks to complete tasks

No visual or noise distractions (headphones provided for students who wish to listen to audiobook or video)

Allowed extra time to complete questionnaires and tasks

Positive reinforcement and positive feedback

Extra guidance and after-class hours available upon request

Assistive technology (speech-to-text and text-to-speech)

Set: Teacher will introduce the author Guy de Maupassant and explain to the class his background and style of writing. The teacher will describe what the late 1800s and early 1900s were like, the time during which Maupassant lived. Then the teacher will ease into the topic of discussion: The Necklace.

Modeled Instruction / Demonstrate: The teacher will read The Necklace to the students in the class. If necessary, students will also have access to audio recordings and video recordings of the same story. The teacher will also hand out a guided questionnaire to the students to hold onto.

Shared Instruction / Guide: The teacher will complete a questionnaire with students and students will then be asked to break that information down into their own graphic organizers. Students will be informed that these graphic organizers will be used as their foundation to write about

Guided Practice / Collaborative Learning: Students will be split into groups of 3-4 in their own breakout areas. Students will discuss the story in 2/4 ways: historical context, main idea, influence of time period on setting, and character drama. They will document their ideas in a shared document and only one person per group will submit this work.

Independent Practice / Independent Learning: Students will write an essay on 1-4 points made during their collaborative learning time. Students may choose to focus on one aspect or even write about all 4 as distinct points in their essay relating to how setting and time period affect the main idea of the story as well as how characters interact with one another. Their essay will be ⅗ paragraphs long, and include 4/6 quotes from the story or ⅗ facts about the author and time period to support their claims.

Closure: Students will effectively write an essay detailing the effects of time period and place on the characters in the story, or focus on solely the historical context or main idea of the story in a ⅗ paragraph essay. This is after they make a graphic organizer of 2/4 of these aspects of the story in their collaborative group. Both assessments will be collected.

Assessment:

#1 Students will write about 2/4 aspects concerning the short story The Necklace with a group of students. 1 per group must be submitted. This will count for 4/10 points.

#2 Students will write a 3-5 paragraph essay on 1-4 of these aspects, and will include 4/6 quotes from the story and/or ⅗ facts about the author and time period from where they lived. This will count for 6/10 points available in the lesson.

Reflection: (To be completed at the end of lesson; Be sure to be reflective about your teaching behaviors and student outcomes (academic and behavioral).

If students do not respond as expected in this assessment, there will be another assessment used in the form of an open-ended and open-book written exam. Students will write about the main plot of the story and how characters interact in the story using 4/6 quotes from the story. This will count for 6/10 points. As for the first part of the lesson, students will work alongside the teacher using guided questions to write about 2/4 aspects about the story.

LESSON PLAN #4

Subject Area: English Language Arts Integrated Subject: Reading and Art

Grade: 7 Specific Topic: Comprehension

Objective/s: Students will be able to make two out of three comparisons and contrasting points between original source material and audio/video/multimedia version of material.

Standards: (Include complete standard)

LAFS.7.RI.3.7 Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium’s portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words).

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